Should you purchase wedding insurance for your big day?

For many, a wedding day is a hugely important event. Not just the fact that the bride and groom are making a big commitment to each other witnessed by their family and friends, but it is often the largest financial commitment many couples will make, other than a house purchase.

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The average cost of a wedding has risen in recent times as this news article illustrates. However, couples can choose a wedding style and budget to suit them.

Probably the biggest spend is often the costs of the venue so it’s probably a good place to start when planning and budgeting your big day.

If you are looking for a wedding hotel venue in Gloucestershire you could consider The Speech House Hotel in the Forest of Dean http://www.thespeechhouse.co.uk/.

To insure or not to insure?

With the many different bills and costs associated with a wedding day it can be tempting to look at insurance as a bill you can afford not to pay, but should the worst happen insurance will at least give you some of the wasted expense back.

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What is covered?

So if you decide to go for insurance what sorts of eventualities are covered? Obviously there are some differences policy to policy, but in general what won’t be covered will be if one half of the wedding couple backs out at the last minute or if it’s discovered that either the bride or groom has been cheating behind the other’s back.

However, they will normally cover if you need to cancel due to bride, groom or a very close relative of the couple falling seriously ill. Some also cover cancellation if the bride or groom is made redundant prior to the main event. They will also cover you if a supplier, for instance, wedding car hire or catering lets you down, and against big disasters such as flooding or fire at your chosen venue.

Other options

It’s worth checking existing home insurance policies as there may be some provision for wedding cover included or perhaps just a small fee to extend existing cover.

You also should remember section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act which means if you pay for anything over £100 on a credit card (including deposits) you can make a claim against the credit card company for any supplier or product failures.

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